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Cilantro-Lime Quinoa with Black Beans

May 5, 2018
This is a super easy, gluten free recipe that goes great with any Mexican dish-tacos, burritos, enchiladas, fajitas, quesadillas, etc. It’s also a great side dish to serve with those grilled summer kabobs, and it pairs well with a spinach salad for an easy, healthy lunch. Enjoy!

Ingredients

• 1 cup of quinoa
• 2 cups of vegetable broth (You can use water if you don’t have vegetable broth, however, I think the broth gives more flavor)
• 3 garlic cloves
• 3 Tablespoons fresh lime juice
• ½ cup fresh cilantro
• 1 (15oz.) black beans, rinsed and drained
• ¼ teaspoon granulated Swerve sweetener
• salt and pepper to taste

Instructions

1. In a medium sized pot, add the broth and the quinoa. Bring to a boil. Cover and simmer on low heat for about 15 minutes, or until all the broth has evaporated
2. Remove from heat and let stand for 5-10 minutes
3. Remove lid and fluff quinoa with a fork.
4. Stir in garlic, lime juice, cilantro, black beans, Swerve
5. Season with salt and pepper as desired
6. Serve warm
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Hodgson Mill....Premium Quality Whole Grains

August 12, 2017

This past week, I had the opportunity to visit the Hodgson Mill headquarters in Effingham, IL. I have to admit; I live in IL and had no idea that Hodgson Mill products were created in a small rural town about an hour east from where I grew up. If I knew about this information sooner, I can guarantee I would have already made the trip. Below, I will discuss some of the delicious whole grain products you can purchase from Hodgson Mill as well as some of the health implications of eating whole grains.

Whole grains…should you eat them or should you avoid them? The subject of whole grains is a heavily debated topic in the nutrition field. People who are low carb advocates say you don’t need to eat whole grains in a healthy diet, while people who are vegan say you can’t live a long and healthy life without sufficient whole grains. Who is correct? Well I can tell you that both sides of the whole grain argument have valid truths. It’s true that you technically don’t need whole grains to live or produce glucose; our bodies are able to burn fat for fuel in the absence of significant carbohydrates in the diet and this can be done in a healthy, nutritious way. However, being a person who has followed a low carb diet with tremendous success, I do believe there are wonderful benefits to eating whole grains at times to enhance health. One of the biggest reasons why I think everyone needs to eat some whole grains from time to time is to promote better gut health. A lot of research is showing a strong correlation between gut health and increased risk of chronic diseases such as obesity, and type 2 diabetes etc. The microbes that are created from eating whole grains enhance the good, healthy bacteria in the gut. While research is still ongoing in this area, the results look promising. As I said before, I am a person who has followed a low carb diet for various reasons and I don’t intend on drastically increasing my carb intake based on the latest gut research. However, a few times a week I have added a small serving (1/2 cup) of whole grains to my diet to promote better gut health while still minimizing carbohydrate cravings and blood sugar fluctuations. Which whole grains do I eat? Well you will have to continue reading to find out.

Hodgson Mill offers a variety of whole grain products. You can find various ready-to-eat cereals, oatmeal, and pastas as well as pancake, cake, bread, and flour mixes for those who like to get a little creative in the kitchen. I have personally tried the Ancient Grain Medley, Brown Rice and Quinoa, Sorghum with Rosemary and Garlic, and Organic Cracked Kamut. I eat a ½ cup portion of these products as a side dish to accompany my protein, healthy fats, and non-starchy vegetables at my evening meal. You simply bring 1-2/3 cup of water to a boil in a small saucepan, add 1 cup for example of Ancient Grain Medley, and within 15 minutes you’ll have a delicious and nutritious whole grain that’s approximately 150 calories and 2-4 grams of fiber per serving.

I personally haven’t tried the pancake, biscuit, and bread mixes, but I know several clients and registered dietitians who really enjoy them and eat them regularly. I have created a few recipe ideas using the Hodgson Mill bread and biscuit mixes so look for those results in the near future. Hodgson Mill also offers numerous gluten free products for those who are celiac or avoid gluten to reduce inflammation. You can order all products online at www.hodgsonmill.com. You can also go online to www.hodgsonmill.com and type in your zip code and they will send you a full list of stores within a 50-mile radius of you location where you can buy the products. They also have great customer service so please don’t hesitate to reach out for questions or comments.

If you’ve personally tried some Hodgson Mill products, feel free to share your experiences in the comments section below. You can also check out my Instagram page at username: speakingofnutrition for more information.

And always remember… “ A healthy lifestyle takes confidence, knowledge, and persistence to achieve, but never disappoints when it finally arrives”.



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Black Rice: The Forbidden Rice

July 19, 2017

Black rice is considered a popular super food and was once only consumed by royalty and emperors in Asian cultures. Black rice is actually a purple grain that is cultivated throughout Asia. Its dark, rich color contains numerous health benefits, which makes it a far superior choice compared to traditional white, brown, and basmati rice. One-half cup serving of black rice contains 160 calories, 1.5 grams of fat, 34 grams of carbohydrates, 2 grams of fiber, and 5 grams of protein. Black rice is also a good source of iron so it’s a great addition to the diet for vegans and vegetarians who rely on plant based foods for protein. Below are some additional health benefits of black rice:

1) High in Antioxidants: The outermost layer of black rice is high in anthocryanin-a powerful antioxidant known to fight diseases such as cancer and heart disease. Black rice contains the highest amount of anthocryanin compared to other whole grains.

2) Can Help the Liver with Detoxification: Studies have shown that black rice can help detoxify the body due to its high antioxidant content. These antioxidants help the liver function more effectively by removing toxins from the body.

3) Source of Fiber for Digestive Health: Fiber aids proper digestion, which is why many people need to aim for eating 25-35 grams of fiber per day. One ½ cup serving of black rice is 2-3 grams of dietary fiber. Combine this with large amounts of high fiber vegetables at your next meal and it will certainly help boost your fiber intake.

4) Protects Heart Health: A few studies have shown that black rice has reduced dangerous plaque build up in arteries. This is from the large amounts of anthocryanins found in black rice and it helps reduce LDL cholesterol.

5) Reduce Blood Sugar and Prevent Diabetes: Black rice is a whole grain that is considered low on the glycemic index. Foods lower on glycemic index have less impact on blood sugar when digested. People with diabetes, or those trying to prevent diabetes, can greatly benefit from eating foods lower on the glycemic index.

6) Naturally gluten free: Black rice is a safe whole grain for those who have celiac disease or choose to avoid eating gluten to control inflammation.

Let me know if you have tried black rice and feel free to share your cooking and eating experiences in the comments below. Black rice has a rich, nutty flavor, which adds a dynamic flavor and dimension to many dishes compared to traditional rice. If you give black rice a try, I don’t think you will be disappointed with the outcome.

“A healthy lifestyle takes confidence, knowledge, and persistence to achieve, but never disappoints when it finally arrives”.
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